STAND BY FLIGHTS SOUTHWEST : FLIGHTS SOUTHWEST


Stand by flights southwest : Cheap airfare tickets to hawaii



Stand By Flights Southwest





stand by flights southwest






    southwest
  • The compass point corresponding to this

  • southwesterly: coming from the southwest; "the winds are southwesterly"

  • The southwestern part of a country, region, or town

  • the southwestern region of the United States generally including New Mexico, Arizona, Texas, Nevada, California, and sometimes Utah and Colorado

  • The direction toward the point of the horizon midway between south and west, or the point of the horizon itself

  • the compass point midway between south and west; at 225 degrees





    stand by
  • The state of waiting to secure an unreserved place for a journey or performance, allocated on the basis of earliest availability

  • A person waiting to secure such a place

  • be loyal to; "She stood by her husband in times of trouble"; "The friends stuck together through the war"

  • Readiness for duty or immediate deployment

  • be available or ready for a certain function or service

  • not act or do anything; "He just stood by when the police beat up the demonstrators"





    flights
  • (flight) an instance of traveling by air; "flying was still an exciting adventure for him"

  • Shoot (wildfowl) in flight

  • (flight) fly in a flock; "flighting wild geese"

  • (in soccer, cricket, etc.) Deliver (a ball) with well-judged trajectory and pace

  • (flight) shoot a bird in flight











stand by flights southwest - Stand by




Stand by Me (25th Anniversary Edition) [Blu-ray]


Stand by Me (25th Anniversary Edition) [Blu-ray]



In a small woodsy Oregon town, a group of friends--sensitive Gordie (Wil Wheaton), tough guy Chris (River Phoenix), flamboyant Teddy (Corey Feldman), and scaredy-cat Vern (Jerry O'Connell)--are in search of a missing teenager's body. Wanting to be heroes in each other's and their hometown's eyes, they set out on an unforgettable two-day trek that turns into an odyssey of self-discovery. They sneak smokes, tell tall tales, cuss 'cause it's cool and band together when the going gets tough. When they encounter the town's knife-wielding hoods who are also after the body, the boys discover a strength they never knew they had. Stand By Me is a rare and special film about friendship and the indelible experiences of growing up. Filled with humor and suspense, Stand By Me is based on the novella 'The Body' by Stephen King.

A sleeper hit when released in 1986, Stand by Me is based on Stephen King's novella "The Body" (from the book Different Seasons); but it's more about the joys and pains of boyhood friendship than a morbid fascination with corpses. It's about four boys ages 12 and 13 (Wil Wheaton, River Phoenix, Corey Feldman, Jerry O'Connell) who take an overnight hike through the woods near their Oregon town to find the body of a boy who's been missing for days. Their journey includes a variety of scary adventures (including a ferocious junkyard dog, a swamp full of leeches, and a treacherous leap from a train trestle), but it's also a time for personal revelations, quiet interludes, and the raucous comradeship of best friends. Set in the 1950s, the movie indulges an overabundance of anachronistic profanity and a kind of idealistic, golden-toned nostalgia (it's told in flashback as a story written by Wheaton's character as an adult, played by Richard Dreyfuss). But it's delightfully entertaining from start to finish, thanks to the rapport among its young cast members and the timeless, universal themes of friendship, family, and the building of character and self-esteem. Kiefer Sutherland makes a memorable teenage villain, and look closely for John Cusack in a flashback scene as Wheaton's now-deceased and dearly missed brother. A genuine crowd-pleaser, this heartfelt movie led director Rob Reiner to even greater success with his next film, The Princess Bride. --Jeff Shannon










82% (7)





El Paso Lights-Fifty Miles Out




El Paso Lights-Fifty Miles Out





not hdr-standing on a mountain that overlooks Las Cruces, NM...you could see Las Cruces up close...and the backglow of El Paso behind the mountains in the distance! Another wonderful place to be especially during the fall or winter!! This is the beginning of the far west in the US to me...Texas has some desert, but at the border here it changes and takes on a unique identity that continues across NM, Arizona, and California. One hot place in the summertime!!

Mountains (James Watkins)

mountains grand and gazing-
pillars standing tall-
piercing passioned histories-
hidden in their walls.

delving downward distances-
caverns large and small-
mutant molten metal steams-
fused before the fall.

decant demon-ed destinies-
cooling chasmed halls-
dinosaurs and diamond doors
in massive mirrored malls.

heavy, heaving voices
in paradisian sprawl-
fiery fumes of purity-
creation’s curtain call.

subatomic saturation,
soiled, synthetic signs.
righteous restoration
of prehistoric crimes.

tumultuous-
tempestuous-
waning, wasted pearl-
forethought, full and fragile-
foundation of the world.

hidden in the language
of nature’s cresting yore-
cracked beneath
the stress and strain-
crumbling at the core.

tiny tidbits torn and tumbling-
wiggling in the storm-
recipes and remedies-
chemically reborn.

thickened soups and swirling haze-
brooding-steaming-scorn-
clashing reams of violent schemes-
valleys ripped and torn.

balance within balances,
scrambled eggs at last-
gushing geysered marbled mud
borne before the blast.

consciences of scientists,
syncopated scuds-
bothered by the missing mass-
baffled by the blood.

leaping lemon lizards-
the barn is nearly full-
the hay is neatly in a stack-
this baby’s come full term!

common commonalities,
full circle’s come at last.
see the story in the hills-
yield before your past.

something’s broken,
something’s missing,
something’s come and gone-
something’s at the doorway-
someone’s on the phone.

someone’s at the table-
someone’s on the floor-
someone’s grass
is full of gas-
classical-and more!

rhyming with the timing,
balancing the board-
signals of a sequenced strike,
calm before the storm.

mysteries are meaningful,
when looking at the past.
the scene is somewhat circular,
when stage is come to last.

weakened, muzzled monkeys,
dance before your lord.
the gift of grace is growing cold
squirming on sword.

commentaried cavemen,
come into the fold.
your ears can hear-
your eyes can see-
so come in from the cold.

and listen with some latitude-
to knowledge held in store.
fashioned in the faceless stone
of ancient ocean floor.

squeezed in myriad molecule,
the battle rages on-
raving reverence in reverse
its relevance reformed.

and bow before the evidence-
the courtroom is restored,
through judgment passed,
the script is cast,
in elementary score.

rain fire, you veined volcanoes-
your statement’s on the floor-
and advertise what you surmise-
from secret silent store.

you’ve waltzed in dazzled wonderment-
and touched your maker’s hand,
in timeless thought-
before the fault-
and listened to the plan.

to bring all things to unity-
from eons vile and vast-
to bless-ed end
the future bends,
with glory
unsurpassed.

James Watkins May 2005

The Desert Has a Voice (James Watkins)

The desert has a voice that calls
In dry, dirt dreams-
Warm, wind-washed wonders
In wingless, soulless flight.

Cold, moonlit masquerades
Through long level years,
Crying out with countless cares on deafened ears-
Drowned in measured, motor-muffled madness,
And child-chattered, purposeless flight.

Quietly, calmly calling-
Darkened, deepening desert-
Star-filled with stumbling stalkers
And wounded warriors in fevered nights.

Dreams-peaceful, persistent, dreams-
As wheeled sky turns
Eternal turning, evening eyes-
And thoughts of morning colored light.

Millennial seas-
Doomed and dusty years-
Row upon heaping row of years-
Tears-
Caked, covered
And desolate.

The desert has a voice-
That calls and halts
And peers with perfect perspective-
Stopping us in our way.

“I have seen blood-stained battles!
I have seen despot desires!
I have seen prophets come and go,
And ages pass with shallow…glancing blows!
I have seen civilizations crumble…
Tumbling, heavy-handed
Into pagan pasts!”

The desert has a voice-
And every grain of sand has a name-
Every wind-blown grain of sand.
And someone-somewhere-knows the names.

They have perfect place and purpose-
Rocks cry out! Rocks….sing!
Some soaring angelic scribe somewhere
Records the history of rocks, and sands, and deserts.

Drab, dull, drifting desert distances and plans.
Ragged, jagged, craggy-edged
Mountain spine explosions and
Dry, desert sand.

The desert has voice and future-
With lifted hill-high green valley-
And clear bright stream winding
To cool, crystalline sea.

They wait….silently…
Almost… forever waiting-
But I know the secret of deserts-
And –
Dreams.

James Watkins-April 2006

FOR THOSE INTERESTED I HAVE AN EXHIBITION AT THIS LINK
Wellpark - the story of a rescue





Chi Pham - the girl in white, centre: My Recollection of our Journey 30 years ago.


After the fall of Saigon in April 1975 my father was taken from our family on June 1975 to a re-education camp located the remote jungle of Northern Vietnam. He was a Captain in the Military Signal Corp for the South Vietnamese government. Our life was forever altered along with other millions of Vietnamese in the South. I was 11 years old at the time, the oldest of three girls. My sisters were 8 and 7 years old. Mom was playing the role of mother and father to us so she was very strict and protective of us. But she did such a good
job that we didn't feel like our Dad was missing. Partly because we moved from Vung Tau (sometimes referred to its colonial name of Cap Saint Jacques, a beach city, 78 miles North of Saigon) to live with our maternal grand parents and aunts when Vung Tau was taken over by the communist a few months before Saigon. We received much love from grandma, grandpa and our aunts.

We missed our Dad when looking at family pictures or seeing other kids playing with their Dads but at that time so many families were separated from their loved ones that your loss was nothing compared to others who had lost their Dads forever to the war.

In October 1975, the communists started the "Communism Reform" throughout the country. Rich and middle income residents in Saigon and the urban cities were forced to migrate to forest or mountain areas that were collectively known as the "New Economic Development" zone. The intention was to force people with money to leave and forfeit all of their property without mercy. We were lucky to have the right connections to delay the process of going to the New Economic Development zone. Meanwhile, outside of the city the regime's policy of complete agricultural collectivization deprived peasants of their landholdings, except for tiny personal plots, and required them to work on collective farms.

The whole education system was reorganized to reflect communist ideology. I remembered every morning all the children from the age 6 to 18 years old were forced to be at the park at 6 am prior to school time to exercise in group and attended meeting after school learning about the life of uncle Ho or “Ho Chi Minh” and singing communist’s songs. We were trained to report our parent, relatives and neighbors to the authority if we hear them talked badly about the government or any plan of leaving the country or where the money were hired in the house because under the communist’s rule everyone is equal. They abolished all ranks and privileges based on heredity, position, wealth, or cultural standing.

By July 1976, the new communist regime banned opposition political activity and imprisoned opponents. The campaigns against private businesses in the South by forcing through our home anytime of the day to look for any suspicious activities, money or gold hidden in the house along with constant changing money to smaller denominator so our money became less value induced the flight of about 1 million Chinese and middle-class Vietnamese from their country between 1978–79 often by sea.

After three years living under the communist rules, life became more intolerable. We had no religious freedoms and no freedom to live as we had. Constantly being watched by neighbors we worried that we might be turned in to the local authorities for saying or doing the wrong thing. Our future was uncertain. We lived day by day not knowing what was going to happen to us next. Mom then decided that it was time to leave our country to find the freedom that we once had. Grandma and aunt Nghiem tried to escape a few times prior with no success. They got tricked and lost a lot of money. They were put away for months when they got caught just a few months earlier. Still they were luckier than many others. Some people were put away for years. Some died at sea because pirates killed them or they didn’t make it through stormy weather. Some didn't even make it to sea because their boat was sunk by shooting soldiers. Three of my cousins died from that a few months earlier. Knowing the risk that we may not ever return, mom was still determined to let three of her daughters escape the country with her mom and her two sisters. She took out all her savings and paid for the escape. She couldn't go with us because she wanted to stay back and wait for our father’s return someday.

Escape was very difficult, dangerous and the odds of failure were enormous. Despite the risk of ending up in prison or dying at sea, we did not give up or get weary. We kept trying until all means were exhausted. Freedom is priceless; people were ready to trade their life for it.

This time a trustworthy brother-in-law of aunt Nghiem’s good friend, who was one of the organizers, planned the escape for his entire family and friends. The process of planning the escape was very time consuming and it took years of planning. They had to sell a









stand by flights southwest








stand by flights southwest




Stand By Me [VHS]






A sleeper hit when released in 1986, Stand by Me is based on Stephen King's novella "The Body" (from the book Different Seasons); but it's more about the joys and pains of boyhood friendship than a morbid fascination with corpses. It's about four boys ages 12 and 13 (Wil Wheaton, River Phoenix, Corey Feldman, Jerry O'Connell) who take an overnight hike through the woods near their Oregon town to find the body of a boy who's been missing for days. Their journey includes a variety of scary adventures (including a ferocious junkyard dog, a swamp full of leeches, and a treacherous leap from a train trestle), but it's also a time for personal revelations, quiet interludes, and the raucous comradeship of best friends. Set in the 1950s, the movie indulges an overabundance of anachronistic profanity and a kind of idealistic, golden-toned nostalgia (it's told in flashback as a story written by Wheaton's character as an adult, played by Richard Dreyfuss). But it's delightfully entertaining from start to finish, thanks to the rapport among its young cast members and the timeless, universal themes of friendship, family, and the building of character and self-esteem. Kiefer Sutherland makes a memorable teenage villain, and look closely for John Cusack in a flashback scene as Wheaton's now-deceased and dearly missed brother. A genuine crowd-pleaser, this heartfelt movie led director Rob Reiner to even greater success with his next film, The Princess Bride. --Jeff Shannon










Similar posts:

flights to philippines from usa

cheap fly to vietnam

flights from to

flight to glasgow

air tickets to africa

flights paris to pisa

flight tickets to hong kong

flight locator map

incoming flight schedule



tag : stand by flights southwest flight attendant job listings logan schedules

Comments

Private comment